Am I Seeing It Right, but Saying It Wrong?

Presented by Bill Ross, III
Friday, June 7, 2024 1:30 – 4:30 PM

Interpreting from American Sign Language into spoken English has some unique challenges; fingerspelling, classifiers and signs that are semantically rich. However, the focus of this workshop will be deaf-centric language. Research shows that uninitiated (hearing) people may share terms (mainstream, oral, hearing, and so on) but they do not attach the same meaning to those terms – thus those key words are deaf-centric. Oftentimes, we inadvertently incorporate jargon, subject specific vocabulary, and deaf-centric terms in our interpretation, by doing so, we actually create distance between speaker and listener. This workshop will provide interpreters ways to manage deaf-centric terminology, thus helping interpreters to render a more comprehensible and meaningful interpretation. Attention will be given to techniques that aid in developing greater receptive ability. Additional topics: vocabulary/register, recognizing numbers/fingerspelling, regional sign production, and semantically rich signs. [Participants will have an opportunity to utilize a voice interpreting matrix in small groups]

Building Interpreter Advocacy Skills Young

Presented by Jennifer Hunter
Saturday, June 8, 2024 – 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

When working with students who are deaf or hard of hearing, you are not only interpreting for them; you are often teaching them how to use interpreters. As such, it can be difficult to determine when and where to provide support to ensure the student becomes successfully independent. During this session, we will review educational documents establishing interpreter milestones for students and discuss how to build interpreter advocacy skills for our students during the hustle and bustle of the day-to-day classroom.

Can you understand the Language of Education?

Presented by Jennifer Hunter
Thursday, June 6, 2024 – 3:30 – 6:30 PM

PLAAFPs, IEPs, ARDs- These are just some examples of the unique terminology encountered in educational settings. Do you know what these mean? Are you aware of how they impact the deaf students you are serving? Come to this session for a crash course on various educational laws, acronyms, personnel, and the ever-dreaded ARD meeting to assist you in becoming a better advocate for the students you work with.

Child Protective Services and the CPC

Presented by Andrea Bright-Fontana
Thurs, June 6 12-3:00, 3:30-6:30 (part 1 and 2)

This workshop will explain the CPS process from intake to completion. Participants will analyze the background information provided for a CPS job and perform a self-analysis prior to accepting/declining the job. Participants will also be alerted to the power dynamics and marginalization of deaf children/adults involved in the CPS system. There will also be discussion/activities focusing on how to succinctly and effectively explain (to CPS) the importance of the customs of the deaf communities, language, communication requirements and cultural needs. Professional knowledge and experience will be supplemented with the presenter’s personal experience as a foster and an adoptive parent.

Consecutive Interpreting; Lines of Questioning in Legal Settings

Presented by Deb Martinez
Saturday, June 8th – 9:00 AM – 12 noon

Legal interpreting has life changing consequences for the participants involved. Legal settings by nature are adversarial and often the questions being asked are complex. This workshop will look at how attorneys, police officers, and judges construct questions and how we can use consecutive interpreting to provide a more accurate interpretation. We will analyze the different types of questioning used in legal settings such as attorney client conferences, depositions, and interrogations. We will analyze effective approaches to interpreting in these complex settings through individual analysis as well as group work. This workshop will provide an overview and an opportunity for participants to use and practice consecutive interpreting skills. Those who are ready and interested will also be able to practice consecutive note taking. Everyone is required to bring their own note taking materials. 

Culturally Appropriate Interpreting in LGBTQ Spaces

Presented by Brian Cheslik, PhD and Laura Sicignona
Friday, June 7th – 1:30-3:30 PM

This workshop is geared towards sharing knowledge and experiences to help interpreters minimize the harm that can be caused when working with LGBTQIA+ clients. Participants will learn new signs for various identities within the Queer community, discuss the importance of pronouns & avoiding mis-identification, unpacking your personal beliefs/bias, as well as an examination of the ethical dilemmas that present themselves when working with LGBTQIA+ clients.

Deaf Consumers Profiles: Expectations of Interpreters

Presented by Melissa Bell and Aaron Waheed
Friday, June 7 – 1:30-4:30 PM

Whether you are a seasoned ASL interpreter or an aspiring one, you work closely with many different types of clients who are deaf. How do you adapt to meet the communication needs of each one? How does a client’s knowledge of civil rights and their capacity to advocate for themselves influence your approach to interpreting? You may also have expectations of your deaf clients, but do you know what they expect from YOU? This session will delve into the top 10 expectations that clients wish their interpreters were aware of, and on the lighter side, explore the 5 common profiles of people who are deaf that qualified ASL interpreters encounter in their work.

Deaf, CPS and the Educational System…what you need to know…

Presented by Andrea Bright-Fontana
Fri, June 7 – 9a-12noon, 1:30-3:30 (part 1 and 2)

Whether you are a seasoned ASL interpreter or an aspiring one, you work closely with many different types of clients who are deaf. How do you adapt to meet the communication needs of each one? How does a client’s knowledge of civil rights and their capacity to advocate for themselves influence your approach to interpreting? You may also have expectations of your deaf clients, but do you know what they expect from YOU? This session will delve into the top 10 expectations that clients wish their interpreters were aware of, and on the lighter side, explore the 5 common profiles of people who are deaf that qualified ASL interpreters encounter in their work.

Deaf UNCLE Sam’s Workshop

Presented by Dr. Renee Gonzalez Puerto
Thursday, June 6 – 12:00 – 3:00 PM and Friday, June 7 – 9:00 am – 12:00 

The shared use of a spoken or sign language is key for mutual communication between deaf and hearing communities. However, failure to communicate at the same level between shared languages can obstruct the delivery of information during interpretation. Hence, the goal of this workshop is to teach attendees how to correctly identify communication and language skills within an interpreter’s audience (sender and receiver) using case (CBL) and team (TBL) -based learning strategies. We will review theory and exercises of universal and non-conventional language expression (UNCLE) commonly used by the deaf community. Finally, we will teach how to apply UNCLE, communication, and language skills on-site during pre-session interviews (PSI) to establish more effective communication channels.

Does your Job Spark Joy

Presented by Monique Champagne
Friday, June 7th 9:00 am – 12 noon

Whether working as a VRS interpreter, VRI interpreter, or a Community interpreter, we all encounter numerous challenges in our work and must find ways to manage stressors (i.e., navigating the flow of communication between all parties, managing relationship conflicts that might come up while interpreting, recognize impacts of skill level to ensure that we are the appropriate interpreter for the assignment, and many others). Little is known about job satisfaction within the field of interpreting, yet we are personally impacted by the work that we do.

This workshop is intended to encourage interpreters to understand and explore the elements of job satisfaction as it relates to values they hold about their work. Specific work values to be discussed include: autonomy, altruism, safety and comfort, achievement, status, and relationships. Interpreters will leave this workshop with a new awareness of their own career satisfaction and tools with which to assess and implement change in their own work.

Educational Interpreter Pay – A Panel Discussion

Presented by Randi Turner
Saturday, June 8th – 9:00 AM – 12 noon

The TSID Policy and Advocacy Committee (PAC) is working on issues surrounding K-12 educational interpreter pay, recruitment and retention. We will cover the Committee’s work to date. In addition, the PAC invites you to a Regional Day School Programs for the Deaf panel discussion. Panelists will share how they were successful in increasing interpreter pay in their districts so that participants can use this “how to” knowledge in their own communities.

Incorporating Expansion Techniques in your Interpreting

Presented by Bill Ross, III
Thurs. June 6, 2024, 12:00 noon – 3:00 PM

It is well known that American Sign Language (ASL) and spoken English are significantly different languages. Due to such differences, interpreting from English to ASL necessitates that interpreters employ various linguistic adaptations; expansion techniques is one such adaptation that aids in message equivalency. Expansion techniques are utilized to create conceptually, linguistically, and culturally accurate interpretations that assure Deaf people receive a clear and comprehensible signed message. If interpreters are unfamiliar with expansion techniques, the resulting interpretation will demonstrate unnatural phrasing, incorrect grammatical structures, and errors in language production. Expansion techniques are naturally occurring language features found in the users of American Sign Language. The goal of this workshop is to explore the various linguistic features and effectively incorporate (up to 3-4) specified expansion techniques into our interpreting work.

Interpreter’s Toolkit: Multi-Language Access & Medication (ASL/ English/ Spanish/LSM)

Presented by Dr. Renee Gonzalez Puerto
Thursday, June 6 – 3:30 – 6:30 PM and Friday, June 7 – 1:30 – 4:30 PM

Interpreters provide services to a large and linguistically diverse population that of deaf people. This includes deaf persons who may speak or sign more than one kind of language, with or without a preferred primary language to communicate. Hence, the goal of this workshop is to provide a professional toolkit to improve broad multi-language access and mediation theory, and specific practice towards underrepresented Hispanic/Latino minorities. We will review general principles of multi-language access and mediation during interpretation using case (CBL) and team (TBL) -based learning. We will practice transferable linguistic principles to interpret beyond English/ASL and include good practices to interpret in Spanish/Mexican Sign Language (LSM). Together, this workshop will promote personal and professional tools for interpreters to improve their Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DE&I) practices during multi-language interpretation services.

Interpreting Academic Vocabulary

Presented by Jennifer Hunter
Sunday, June 9, 2024 – 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Educational interpreting very often becomes technical interpreting. With graduation requirements like Biology, Geometry, and US History, educational interpreters find themselves in settings with complex academic vocabulary. As such, it can be difficult to determine or establish the best signs to use. In this session, we will explore resources available to find appropriate signs for academic vocabulary and how to troubleshoot establishing signs for the class.

Is Healing Possible

Presented by Marci Purtell
Thursday, June 6 – 12 p – 3:00 pm

The work we do as Interpreters is wrought with challenges. This workshop will review the types of trauma interpreters experience, discuss strategies to heal from trauma and to walk in mental and spiritual fitness, and will apply strategies to begin addressing trauma in our work.

Managing Genres in American Sign Language

Presented by Bill Ross, III
Sunday, June 9, 2024, 9:00 AM – 12:00 noon

American Sign Language and English handle various language features differently. Differences can be seen in the use of pluralization, numeric incorporation, and constructed dialogues (to name a few). This workshop proposes that the difference in discourse genre should also be managed differently during the work of interpreting. Where does register end and genre begin? We often use varying styles or forms of register and discourse when communicating – some factors that influence register and genre are the goal of the speaker, social context, and audience. To communicate more effectively and clearly, speakers often make changes in their discourse type (or genre). Some examples of discourse are narratives, persuasive arguments, procedural information, and anecdotal comments; we use these styles every day during our dialogues. This training will identify several discourse types and will identify differing methods that sign language interpreters can utilize to manage those differences in their interpretation.

Modernizing Professional Standards in K-12 Interpreting

Presented by Jordan Ward
Sunday, June 9th – 9:00 AM – 12 noon

Ethics lay a foundation for the work interpreters do and K-12 educational interpreters face some unique ethical challenges every day. This workshop will explore various topics related to working as K-12 educational interpreters through the lens of the profession’s guiding ethical standards. Using the RID Code of Professional Conduct and the educational interpreter Code of Ethics (CoE) developed by the National Association of Interpreters in Education (NAIE), participants will engage in discussion and apply ethical guidelines to their daily work experiences. In order to stay relevant, combat stagnation in ethical practices, and promote professional accountability, engaging in discussions about the work in a safe environment is vital to interpreter growth and development. This workshop will provide space for the discussions that are often challenging to have in the daily work environments.

Performance Interpreting

Presented by Brian Cheslik, PhD
Friday, June 7th – 9a-12 noon

In this workshop, participants will learn basic skills that will help prepare them when assigned to performance interpreting jobs. In an effort to combat the profession’s erroneous view that performance interpreting is “low-risk,” the presenter will share his knowledge and experience as a Deaf theatre maker, as well as a CDI who specializes in performance interpreting. In addition, this workshop will also guide interpreters through the ethical ramifications of accepting performance work when you are not qualified, working with Deaf consultants, and crossing boundaries into the Deaf theatre world.

Self-Care ina 2-D world

Presented by Marci Purtell
Thursday, June 6th 1:30-3:30 pm
Sunday, June 9th 9:00 am-12 noon

This workshop will discuss strategies for self-care in a virtual environment. Attendees will learn strategies such as the biomechanics of interpreting, strategies to aid emotional regulation and mindfulness in a virtual environment, and habits we can employ to aid in self-care.

Showing Up for Each Other

Presented by Tyriibah Royal-Lampkins and Stephanie Wheeler (twice)
Friday, June 7, 2024 1:30 – 4:30 PM
Saturday, June 8, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Do you ever feel like making an ethical decision is a little bit like walking through a minefield? We often wonder if we have a responsibility to “let go” of our personal beliefs when we work as an interpreter. This workshop will help us identify the criteria that determine whether a genuine conflict exists. Each participant will consider ways to guide their individual decision-making process. It is important to recognize that our personal beliefs and values do make a difference when we encounter ethical dilemmas. Yet, many of us have been left wondering if the decisions we made were right or wrong, good or bad, or someplace in-between. We will recognize what it means to hold a sacred trust as professionals and how we maintain that trust. Throughout the training we will examine and discuss ethical scenarios, these open discussions will help us determine how prevent ethical explosions. In addition, we will demystify terms that influence our ethical decision making, such as, deontological, teleological, morals, character, and values.

That’s Not What I Meant: Managing Deaf-Centric Language

Presented by Bill Ross, III
Thurs. June 6, 2024 3:30-6:30

This workshop has concepts and ideas from the workshop Am I Seeing it Right, but Saying it Wrong? However, Deaf interpreters (DI) and Deaf community members are the audience of focus. It is well-known that interpretations from American Sign Language (ASL) to spoken English have unique challenges. Those challenges may involve interpreting meaning-laden ideas, such as multi-generational Deafness, oral education, and residential schools. Research shows that such terms, though shared by both the Deaf and hearing communities, do not have shared meaning; these terms are Deaf-centric. Providing an equivalent interpretation to such terms requires knowledge and sensitivity to the language, history, and culture of the Deaf community. Furthermore, when those words are interpreted literally – the meaning is often lost or misunderstood creating greater distance between the Deaf speaker and the people who can hear. Deaf Interpreters can utilize their knowledge and skill to help manage such interactions to achieve linguistic equivalence.

Trauma-Informed Interpreting Practice

Presented by Jacob Thornton and Monique Champagne
Saturday, June 8th 9:00 am – 12 noon

This workshop will outline current psychotherapy approaches to trauma, including Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and Judith Herman’s Trauma Recovery Model. Presenters will outline specific techniques for interpreters to utilize when working. Participants will discuss elements of interpreting relevant to interpreting mental health topics, vicarious trauma, and coping tools for stress. This workshop will be taught in American Sign Language only. No voice interpreting will be provided.

Unpacking Gender

Presented by Zander A.
Thursday., June 6, 2024, 3:30-6:30 PM – Presented in ASL
Friday., June 7, 2024 9:00 AM-12 noon – Presented in English

Why are Deaf trans people at higher risks for mental health, housing, and healthcare problems? Why should there be legal protections for trans people? This workshop aims to address the misconceptions and politicization that surround transgender identities. It will start by clarifying the terminology used by the trans and queer communities. Then, it will delve into why Deaf trans people are at higher risks for mental health, housing, and healthcare problems. It will also discuss whether doing drag means being transgender, and the emergence of “new” trans kids. The workshop will then explore the history of trans identities, the current state of trans rights, the reasons why trans people need legal protections, what is holding us back, and where we go from here. The session will use a mix of research-backed sources and personal input to create an engaging, informative, and open space to talk about what it means to be transgender in America.

  • We will watch a Youtube video interviewing two Deaf and trans people talking about their experience.
  • We will discuss what is appropriate (or not) for a cis interpreter working in a trans or Queer environment, and
  • We will have an open discussion about various ethical situations interpreters might find themselves when working with a trans client. I will pose a scenario and ask for audience members to tell us what they would do in that situation.
  • We will discuss what it means to be an ally and do a second role-play scenario to give participants a chance to practice being an ally to the trans/non-binary community.
  • Have a Q&A time for participants to ask any other questions they may have.

Using Intentional Communication to Navigate Difficult Conversations

Presented by Deb Martinez
Thursday, June 6th – 3:30 – 6:30 PM

Our words can be used to create connection or distance. How do we initiate and partake in highly debated conversations pertaining to our field? How many of us were taught how to navigate difficult conversations? How often do we leave difficult conversations feeling misunderstood or unheard? What conversations are we avoiding and at what price to ourselves and the communities we serve? This session will introduce the concept of Intentional Communication. Intentional Communication incorporates the practices of Mindfulness and Non-Violent Communication to create a roadmap, internally and externally, towards more effective communication. Mindfulness creates the pause from reactivity to reacting. NVC provides the structure or framework to be able to define the parts of a conversation that allow people to have more effective communication. Together we will explore common communication approaches that are unhelpful, tools for being able to listen to another without judgment, blame, defensiveness, etc., and an approach to structuring difficult conversations that lead to being able to listen to another for understanding. We do not need to have a shared world view to understand each other however we do need to have the ability to listen and speak with intention. Intentional Communication is about making the decision to take responsibility for our thoughts, words, and actions. Through Intentional Communication we can speak and listen more effectively thereby enhancing collaboration, embracing differences, and take a greater step towards equity, inclusiveness, and belonging within our interpreting communities.

What are YOU looking at? Prosodic Cues in ASL and English

Presented by Laurel Whitsett
Thursday, June 6th – 12 noon -3:00 PM

This presentation deals with the topic of prosody in both ASL and English, and it will focus on the differences and similarities between the two languages’ transmission of phrase boundaries and prominence. Attendees will learn to recognize predictable prosodic cues that signify non-lexical meaning, the goal being to enhance receptive interpreting skills.

Where do I stand?

Presented by Bill Ross, III
Friday, June 7, 2024 9:00 AM – 12
noon

Do you ever feel like making an ethical decision is a little bit like walking through a minefield? We often wonder if we have a responsibility to “let go” of our personal beliefs when we work as an interpreter. This workshop will help us identify the criteria that determine whether a genuine conflict exists. Each participant will consider ways to guide their individual decision-making process. It is important to recognize that our personal beliefs and values do make a difference when we encounter ethical dilemmas. Yet, many of us have been left wondering if the decisions we made were right or wrong, good or bad, or someplace in-between. We will recognize what it means to hold a sacred trust as professionals and how we maintain that trust. Throughout the training we will examine and discuss ethical scenarios, these open discussions will help us determine how prevent ethical explosions. In addition, we will demystify terms that influence our ethical decision making, such as, deontological, teleological, morals, character, and values.

You Can’t Sit with Us: Interpersonal Relationships and Horizontal Violence among Interpreters (2 parts)

Presented by Jordan Ward
Friday, June 7th – 9:00 AM – 12 noon (part 1 of 2)
Friday, June 7th – 1:30 PM – 3:30 PM (part 2 of 2)

Interpersonal relationships lay the foundation for the work of ASL–English interpreters. Professional relationships can have a significant impact on one’s behaviors, physical health, and psychological health, all of which can have impact on the work of an interpreter. This thesis explores the perceptions of, and relationships between, interpreters working primarily in community and K-12 educational settings. Prior to this study, no known research has been conducted examining the nature of interpersonal relationships between professional interpreters working in settings different from their own. An exploratory study was conducted through a survey and an interview to understand if and how interpreters develop and maintain cross-setting relationships with interpreters working in different primary settings.